December 28, 2016Filed under micro#live-coding#software development#tweetstormMarkdown source

I originally posted this as a tweetstorm, but I’m treating this as the canonical and adding a tweet to the end of that “topic” linking back here. Indie web forever.


  • Trying to get set up with Jamon Holmgren to live-stream some pair-programming.

    This is not a solved problem. Good grief.

  • Final solution (so far) includes both Screenhero and Hangouts on Air. :headdesk:

  • That got us most of the way there; now we’re actually using Hangouts+Zoom. This. is. bonkers.

December 26, 2016Filed under micro#software development#text editors#tweetstormMarkdown source

I originally posted this as a tweetstorm, but I’m treating this as the canonical and adding a tweet to the end of that “topic” linking back here. Indie web forever.


  • I’ve spent the last couple weeks using VS Code instead of Atom. It has a lot of things to recommend it, especially speed. It’s fast.

  • However, I have to say: it’s painfully obvious to me on macOS that Code is developed by people who aren’t Mac-native. Atom is.

  • And that’s okay—but it means that as many things as I like about Code over Atom, it always just feels a little off to me.

  • Ultimately, what I want is the extensibility promised by both Code and Atom, but with actually native UIs and native performance.

  • So on that note… @raphlinus, how’s XiEditor coming along? Because its approach is what we all really want, I think.


And he replied!

December 16, 2016Filed under micro#javascript#software development#tweetstormMarkdown source

I originally posted this as a tweetstorm, but I’m treating this as the canonical and adding a tweet to the end of that “topic” linking back here. Indie web forever.


  • JavaScript experiences which induce profound frustration in me:

  • I had gotten in an insane state where things just stopped working that had previously been working as I updated to Ember CLI 2.6.

  • After much tearing of hair, I started over from scratch and repeated the upgrade process.

    Everything works now.

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • Then: rm -rf node_modules bower_components and test again.

    Nothing works now.

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • Consistently, it works fine after the upgrade and ember init finishes. Then, if I do a clean install of the dependencies, it fails.

  • And it fails in the same ways. So ultimately I’ll be chasing those, because we’re not going to get stuck here.

  • But this is an infuriating experience. If you’ve ever believed npm’s claim that non-deterministic installs aren’t a problem… consider this a data point in the opposite direction.

    ┻━┻ ︵╰(°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

October 21, 2016Filed under micro#lightning-rs#rust#software development#tweetstormMarkdown source

I originally posted this as a tweetstorm, but I’m treating this as the canonical and adding a tweet to the end of that “topic” linking back here. Indie web forever.


  • My online writing needs are weird. I have searched for years, and unfortunately… I need to write a custom CMS.

  • I thought briefly about hammering together what I need with Metalsmith.io and its plugins. But that would be a stopgap.

  • So the inevitable comes to pass: I commit to, however slowly, build the CMS I need.

    Probably in Rust—so it should be crazy fast.

  • If you want to follow along on this site generator/CMS adventure (it’ll move slowly), you can do so here.1

  • Status: looking at C bindings for Pandoc and thinking about implementing a Rust wrapper for libpandoc vs. shelling out to pandoc. 🤔

  • First pass: just going to shell out on the command line. Second pass… well, if speed is what I’m going for…

  • I’ve guessed this for a while, but I can confirm it now: Clap is a really fantastic command-line argument library.


  1. For posterity’s sake (ha!) it’s worth note that the original link here was to yassg-btwir not lightning-rs. I actually noted as much, writing:

    That repo name is for “Yet Another Static Site Generator (This One’s In Rust)” because I feel so creative today.

    Note the headdesk-worthy initialism failure: it should have been btoir not btwir. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

August 28, 2016Filed under micro#ethics#philosophy#tweetstormMarkdown source

I originally posted this as a tweetstorm, but I’m treating this as the canonical and adding a tweet to the end of that “topic” linking back here. Indie web forever.


This has been a fascinating weekend of conversations, many of them about systems and institutions and technology—with everyone from Lyft and Uber drivers to Trevin Wax, Joe Carter, and Matthew Lee Anderson.

The conversations Stephen Carradini and I have been having on Winning Slowly over the last couple seasons, and this season ahead, all seem more important to me than ever before. Not because the show itself is very important—it isn’t—but because these issues, and one question in particular, seem increasingly urgent in our day.

That question is simple: Can we say no to given technologies or opportunities, not only as individuals but as communities?

If we cannot, we are slaves to whatever idea someone dreams up next, whether it is good or bad, beautiful or wicked. Our tools will own us.

If we can, then at least some things I believe we ought. The question then will be: what technologies not only can we but must we refuse?

The answers to those questions are more than a tweetstorm can disentangle, indeed will require years of hard work and thought to search out. But as of right now, too few are even asking them—we think instead, “We can, and we may do some good, and so we must!”—heedless of the cost.

These questions press especially on those of us in technology, those of us who teach, and those of us in positions of influence. The things we choose—including, sometimes most importantly, silence and refusal—will shape not only our own but also many others’ lives.

Women in Rust

January 10, 2016Filed under tech#podcasting#rust#tweetstormMarkdown source

Tweets on Psych Medication

Or: That time I went to town on Peter Leithart about psych medications.

July 22, 2015Filed under theology#tweetstormMarkdown source